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Slow Down, You Move Too Fast: This is Country Living


By webmaster - Posted on May 3, 2011

By Chris Eckman

I just love Parshallville! The people are warm and wonderful. Our neighbors are wonderful. When we need help, they are there and we return the favor...the way things used to be.

People wave when they see you in the yard or walking on the road or pass you in your car! As I sit on my porch, some of my favorite things are...hearing the sound of the tractors and the sweet smell of the hay being bailed, or just watching it rain.

And then there is the wonderful wildlife -- the deer, birds, fox, groundhogs, oppossum, racoons, and yes, even the annoying little, seedstealing, chipmunks and squirrels. They are all part of "Country Life" and I just love it! Here are some more reasons that I love this community:

Did you know....

That there are many deer in our community?

That there are horses being ridden up and

That many people walk their dogs on the road?

That there are tractors going up and down the road?

That kids walk and ride bikes to and from each others’ homes on the road?

That there are often senior citizens in golf carts having an outing on the road?

There are also joggers and walkers on the road?

For these reasons I ask that you PLEASE OBEY the SPEED limit of 25 in the Village. Although the speed is not 25 on each end of Parshallville Road, it should be. The same activities go on there as they do in the village.

I also believe that at least 85% of our traffic through Parshallville are our neighbors, with the exception of the Grist Mill traffic in the fall. So we all need to be responsible for each other, protect our community, our neighbors, and our wildlife by slowing down.

Where are we all going in such a hurry anyway? Slow Down...You Move Too Fast!

Fun Fact

The Purple Gang, notorious Prohibition bootleggers from Detroit, owned a farm in Parshallville on Allen Rd. It was common knowledge amongst the locals that the mobsters stayed at the farm, which was one of many hideouts in rural Michigan. Chicago mobster Al Capone was rumored to have visited the farm.